Why Procurement and Marketing Go Hand-in-Hand

 

Ever worked in a large organization? If so, you may have heard of procurement and marketing.

Procurement and marketing may be the same as two completely different things.

Believe it or not, procurement and marketing may be more similar than you think, especially when it comes to tendering.

For marketers who want to find a new tender, it can be difficult to get what you need from procurement.

Lucky for you, we’re here to help you combine procurement and marketing.

Let’s take a closer look at procurement and marketing and what it means for your company.
What is Procurement?

People may mistakenly think of procurement for purchases, and vice versa. And it may be easy to understand why.

Procurement involves vendor selection, setting up payment terms and purchasing goods and services. In most cases, procurement is an essential part of business strategy.

Often, the purchase is only one part of the procurement. This refers to buying goods and services, along with receiving or sending payments.

Although procurement is important, it is not possible to create or destroy the company itself.

To better understand the true value of procurement, let’s consider a study conducted by Hackett Group.

According to Forbes, the study shows that top procurement organizations spend 25 percent less on procurement than other companies.

What does this mean for businesses? You do not need to spend too much on getting the best results.

What is the Relationship Between Procurement and Marketing?

Conflict sometimes arises between procurement and marketing departments.

Procurement wants to help businesses maximize return on any investment – without exception.

Meanwhile, marketing requires procurement to help launch a campaign.

Marketers want to run a campaign and need money to do it. With a good relationship with procurement, marketing can get the money it needs.

How to Bridge the Gap Between Procurement and Marketing

With the right approach, marketing can be a new friend of procurement.

There are several ways to bridge the gap between procurement and marketing, among others:

Maintain open communication. Do not leave procurement or marketing in the dark. Maintain constant contact, and everyone will be able to keep up to date.
Make the procurement process simple. Long negotiations will not be useful for the marketing and procurement department. But a simple procurement process reduces stress for everyone.
Choose a value above the cost. What campaign costs are less important than the benefits they can make to a business. If procurement and marketing are value-focused, they can see closely how a campaign will help the company.
Building relationships Procurement and marketing want to help ordinary businesses become successful brands. Together, procurement and marketing can build trust and respectful relationships to help the company achieve its goals.
Procurement and marketing go hand in hand. If you take the time to build a bridge between procurement and marketing, your company can enjoy its benefits for years to come.